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already cancelling flights. even talk about shutting down the new york transit. hurricane irene wasn't that bad. i'm not going to worry this time, sam. >> dan, we were right over here. the thing about hurricane irene, we got to remember, it was a very bad storm, it brought a lot of rain and a lot of flooding to inland areas. it didn't do the coastal damage. all of the problems that you could have with this system, coastal damage is just one, then you have rain, wind and then flooding. in this case, you have snow as well. you got those five points. maybe one point wasn't as bad in irene in the biggest part of new york. but i'll tell you in the biggest population center of new york, but that was a bad storm for a lot of folks. be prepared for this storm to have a stronger coastal effects. it may be more wind and more rain if these forecasters are right this morning. our ginger zee is right now in atlantic city, where they're getting ready for that. i remember that coastline, it barely ramps out from the water to where those casinos are, good morning. >> i have lost everything. i have n
, it was irene and then lee directly after that. this storm they are saying could be a 1000 a share the mid atlan. i think that means more rain than you expect to see in 1000 years. i would be willing to bet that it will not be long before we see another one of them because we are changing the odds by changing the earth. one thing for all of us to remember, even as we deal with it on the east coast, this is exactly the kind of order people will be dealing with all over the world. 20 million people were dislocated by floods in pakistan two years ago. there are people with fears about what other nations will survive the rise of sea level. we're seeing horrific trout not just in the midwest, but much of the rest of the world. this is the biggest thing that has ever happened on earth, climate change. and our response has to be the same, and the two. >> bill mckibben, what are you waiting until after the presidential election to have your 20-city tour raising the issue? >> we have been involved as we can be in the political fight, but we don't want this issue to go away when elections are over. even a
higher than irene in new york harbor. >> wow. >> irene didn't make flooding. but if you take irene and add four more feet to the top of that surge, you're well over battery park. you're well up above the seawalls on both the east river and the hudson. then you think about the other side. you think about hoboken, you could get water 12 feet higher than normal. what would that do to the property? what would that do to rthe refineries over there. >> it's been hugging the east coast for a while. are we talking about the del marvo area, is it east of that, or is that the quandary here. >> that's the $60 million question. we know this storm is still going straight. it is not forecast to continue straight. it will turn west and hit the u.s. if it turns quickly it will hit the del marvo and truly affect washington, d.c. with a significant bigger punch than is forecast now. >> with hardly any drainage. >> you push that water up to chesapeake and all of a sudden you have a significant basin that will take water and it will go up quickly. that's not the forecast. if it goes up north, it takes
advisory on hurrican irene. we want to go to rob marciano who will tell us what this latest advisory is about. >> it's frightening, up to 85-mile-an-hour wind now. there's a possibility from reading some nuggets from the national hurricane center that it could strengthen some more. we knew we had that possibility. still over the gulf stream where waters are still warm enough to sustain a hurricane. also getting into an environment where it favored strengthening. that's what we've seen. here it is in the satellite picture. 85-mile-an-hour winds. that's a moderate strength category one storm with possible strengthening as we go through time. about 380 miles south of new york city it's movement has picked up northerly about 15 miles an hour and we still expect that turn toward the west later on. this is huge. reading some technical stuff, the tropical storm force winds, diameter nearly 800 miles wide. that is huge. the second largest tropical system we've seen in the last few decades. hurricane force winds extend 150 miles out. the amount of damaging winds is about 350 to 400 m
you can see the trees. hurricane irene they lost enough trees. $22,000 worth of trees fell down. this storm expected to be much tougher, more devastating than hurricane irene. look at this. that's a scaffold around an art project. new york city is full of scaffolding like that. things that we are watching today. want to head it over now to "cnn newsroom." newsroom." they're up next. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good morning to you. i sure hope you're keeping dry somewhere. i'm carol costello. thank you so much for being with us. we begin this morning with hurricane sandy, within hours expected to explode into this superstorm. most of us have never season anything like it in our lifetime. already huge, tropical storm force winds spanning a width of nearly 1,000 mimes. it's aiming at the heart of the east coast, the most heavily populated corridor in the country. 50 million people are expected to feel the effects. hundreds of thousands are now under evacuation orders. fema predicts damage costs of about $3 billion just for wind damage alone. heavy rains or snow, storm
the winners, so to speak, and the losers because it is asymmetric, right? >>> now last year hurricane irene's initial projections were $7 billion. turned out to be $15 billion. there were a lot of ancillaries once the checks come out from the government and private insurers. stimulus to the gdp. not big enough to move the needle. this one we're getting initial projections is much bigger. the two cohorts in stocks most impacted the home depot-like places, let's call them that, they were basically moved up a day ahead of the storm and then pulled off once the market turned out to be. >> we didn't see much of that on friday in terms of home depot or at lowe's which i thought was interesting and most of the retailers have closed their books on saturday, last saturday, so the impact of the storm won't actually be seen until the following quarter or the next month when they report retail sales. lowe's is the exception. they closed books on saturday. all the runup, the generators they've sold, the batteries, the flashlights, those things were almost sold out pretty much across the board. that shou
here, the effects of sandy, are already worse than what we saw with irene. >> absolutely. absolutely. >> now, you see you have packed up the dog. you were under a mandatory evacuation, but you did decide to wait until this moment. did you think that there was a time you could actually ride it out? >> yeah. >> we did until the winds really started picking up. the tide wasn't going out at all, and it was well past high tide. >> i think a lot of public officials are going to be glad that you are heeding the warning and deciding to get out. i'm going to let you get on with your boat. thank you very much for waiting. suzanne, i also want you to take a look down the street here. the guy that you see in the scuba gear, his name is paul. he is a lifeguard. paul, come on over here and talk to me here for a moment. take off the goggles and what not. i know you have been down here in the neighborhood. you've been monitoring things. obviously, you're dressed appropriately for the occasion, but i know a lot of public officials want folks like you to head on out. >> um, yes. however, i'm real clos
. >> reporter: sandy could create a storm surge larger than last year's hurricane irene. possibly filling the subway tunnels with water. >> lower manhattan is the most vulnerable spot for a storm surge. >> no doubt about they expect this to be a large problem for central new jersey, including philadelphia, atlantic city, new york city all of the way up toward boston. something that we need to pay attenti attention to. >>> now, potentially new york city, where hurricane irene last year wasn't so bad in the city itself, what would you say to people who are tempted to write this off? >> i want to remind folks about that hurricane, it was a bad storm, dan, it just didn't deliver the wind damage that new york city expected and the surge wasn't really here. but if you look inland where it was catastrophic flooding and so many folks were acted that storm. it was a terrible storm. this storm hurricane center said that it will have all of those elements focused on these big population areas, and new york city is one of them. i'm going to ask everyone to be prepared. >> all right, better safe than
: last year's hurricane irene was the most recent storm to pummel the northeast. it cost the industry roughly $4.3 billion in insured losses. analysts can't yet predict how steep losses from sandy will be, but they say the companies with the most exposure include: liberty mutual, travelers, allstate, and chubb. auden thinks those firms will be able to shoulder a financial hit if the storm's damage mirrors that of irene. >> with every event companies gather more information on potential losses, so catastrophe losses become much more sophisticated. companies use those to measure aggregation of losses and potential losses from a given event. >> reporter: damage from wind, falling trees, and rain coming through roofs is covered by standard insurance policies. but analysts fear much of the damage from sandy to homes and businesses is likely to come from storm surge flooding which isn't. the insurance information institute estimates roughly 300,000 homes in the northeast could be vulnerable to this type of event. but the institute is optimistic many homeowners have flood insurance. >> nothi
including this one. so only twice before irene being one of them. here's why. the storm is still 24 to 36 hours away. the flow starting to flow up over that and you see this barrier, it could easily with a 10 to 20-foot rise wave up and there's the iconic boardwalk some being boarded up so taking it very seriously not only here in atlantic city but through the barrier islands up the jersey shore. and that's who it's going to hit. right to those graphics. i need to show you who will get what and when. that storm surge very important. i want to show you exactly what to expect here. 6 to 9 feet in that red area or 4 to 8 feet, excuse me, in that magenta area and then the blue still, you've got a 1 to 3-foot surge and all coming from the southeast end to the northwest. let me show you the wind forecast, because sam showed you how big and how many people will be involved in this. but look at how high those wind speeds go, 60 to 80 miles per hour, pittsburgh, d.c., new york city and boston in that red zone, and, of course, it extends all the way back to the eastern great lakes too. we'll watch
learned from last year's hurricane irene. here's the local mayor. all right, well, we talked to the local mayor earlier and they are prepared under 24-hour operations here trying to keep the lines of communication open with residents here who chose not to evacuate as well as keeping up-to-date with everything going on in terms of emergency responses and any type of damage that may come because of hurricane sandy, don and chad. >> sandy, standby. we have chad myers here again. sandy, you can play along in this as well. so we have sandra, chad is in ocean city, maryland, 200 miles north of georgia. georgia is getting pelted at this point. how long before sandy starts to feel what he's feeling? >> there are arms on this storm. they are almost like you see a picture of the hurricane with spiral bands. that's what we have with the storm. let me walk over here to describe what you're going to look at for the next 36 hours. i want you to know when you see it what you're seeing. there's the center of the storm right there, don. wherever there's color, that's where it is storming. that's where it
of the restaurant here. he was telling us that basically it was highest he had ever seen. he was here for irene last year. he has been with the restaurant for about a decade here at battery gardens. saying again it was the most water he had ever seen come up. he seas if it gets to be the 11-foot level, melissa, that will be trouble. he will predicts that will go above the two levels of terrace he has and begin to seep into his restaurant there. back to you. melissa: wow, robert gray, down at battery, normally one of the most beautiful places in manhattan at the very southern tip. thanks so much for that report. >>> the storm expected to hit an area responsible for 6.5% of the country's refining capacity. does that mean gas prices are about a spike? stock exchanges shuttered today and tomorrow. what will happen when trading starts again? price futures group senior market analyst phil flynn has been following all the stories for us. i want to ask you, philings because you're at cme. s&p futures will open about an hour from now. investor sentiment pent up because markets closed today and tomorrow. what
here. also when you think back to what happened with irene, there was concern about flooding on the sound side here of the outer banks, so, you know, this area is prone to flooding. that's something that everyone's keeping a close eye on. also the winds out here are picking up. they've been right around ten to 25 miles per hour off and on. the rain off and on. but the situation out here will deteriorate as the day goes on. this area remains under a flash flood watch and a tropical storm warning. so people are taking stock of that. they're getting supplies. a lot of peel pl-- people planng to ride this storm out. we talked about some of the people who hadn't boarded up their windows. it turns out there's a mix of people there. are some people who have homes here who don't live here, so those homes have not been boarded up. some people who plan to ride the storm up. that's what we're seeing here. some who have left the area. because when you think back to what happened with irene, irene was more of a direct hit. people saw a lot of damage in this area. this time they're expecti
, former dnc chair and vermont governor howard dean is facing off against ed conard. irene rosenfeld, the ceo of mondolez international. the markets aren't to be forgotten. at 8:30 eastern time, we will be joined by jim grant. we're going to talk about the best investing strategies for the rest of the year with him. first, let's get you up to speed on this morning's headlines. over to andrew. >>> friday we'll get the government september jobs report. could be a game changer for the election. we'll get a hint of what may be to come. the employment report coming at 8:15 eastern time. poll forecasters say the economy likely added 155,000 private payroll jobs this month. we'll bring you the number and get you instant reaction from joel prakken. in corporate news, richard schultz is pressing forward with a possible $11 billion buyout of the retailer. schultz and at least four private equity firms have reportedly started examining the books of the economy. at the same time, he is said to be negotiating individually with the pe firms on the details of how his roughly 20% stake in the compan
: well, we should look at irene. this will cause at least as much problem as irene. i expect this to get their act right back together and do not be viced if this is a category two or category three by sunday before it turned to the northwest. it is very warm water in the atlantic. very warm. we back in the 1950s. we had ten major hurricanes on the east coast including hazel in 1954 in mid-october which had a path similar to this but it was to the west. that want into north carolina and you notice this storm is attacking from the southeast, right? and basically, it is that path superimposed to the east so hazel led to wind gusts at 100. >>neil: what makes it a mess for the northeast, combining with the other areas? >>guest: what makes it, (a), it moves slow and intensifies miling water to the northeast beaches. that is first. >>neil: and it sits? >>guest: full moon and look at the way the coast is shaped. it is shaped so you funnel water into new york city and push the storm surge in. the normal hurricane like irene comes along the coast and heads for long island and we get flooding alon
surge if it is as forecast, which will be worse than hurricane irene last year, could create some serious problems in terms of getting in to the subway system, in terms of getting into the con ed steam lines and potentially the electrical system. and so even if the wind doesn't blow out power, there could be pry empty differen preemptive power outages. so that's one of the many reasons that they decided to hunger down with all the financial markets. stay home, there's money to be made later and we'll just deal with it. for now just a little bit of a breeze blowing here. that is clearly supposed to chan change. >> where do you go later? >> you have to find a pole, right? you know that that's -- every guy out in a strong breeze, you've seen -- you've got to find a pole around there, right? >> i'll look for it. there's light poles and stuff, but i think i need to get a little further away from the water. >> yeah, that would be a good idea, too. >> we'll have to get him a bungee cord. okay. let's get a little bit more on the forecast on the storm in maria larosa. >> as you mentioned,
will likely exceed the $12 billion to $16 billion from hurricane irene which battered the northeast in august of 2011 says a chief economist. and an economics professor at smith ity of maryland school of business estimates it will result in about $35 billion to $45 billion total losses. and another company projects $10 billion to $20 billion of damage about half insured. property damage will be repaired and lost economic output will be adjust set by other increased activity as residents prepare for the hurricane. and here is another story about economic impact from "wall street journal." losses may exceed those of the 2011 storm. airlines and shippers expect an extended disruption. will cost them millions of dollars and leave thousands of fliers and goods stranded. airlines will cancel a total more than 14,600 flights as monday and more than the roughly 10,000 canceled due to hurricane irene in 2011. irene comes united continental holdings about $40 million in revenue. delta airlines said hurricane irene forced it to cancel about 2,200 flights costing $15 million in profits. delta has cancele
storm and look as the these from nasa, now sandy is there on your left and irene is on your right. sandy is about twice as big as irene and it is shortly downgraded after hurricane status, they will decide on approving a new tax and they have spent about 2. $5 million. the measure would add 1.5% tax on sugary drinks. now richmond's mayor said it is a good way to begin the fight against obesity. >> and we know it is the perfect place to start because it has absolutely no nutritional valley. it is twice the calories... >> it is going to result in higher grocery bills whether or not they drink soda. >> it is fun to buy it and they will be the first in the nation to impose a tax. >>> the giants dugout, they were expecting even bigger crowds after tomorrow's parade but authorities are worried about counterfeit money gear and they have confiscated 1200 shirts being sold illegally. you can tell it is counterfeit money if it lacks the hologram sticker. >>> and they are offering everybody in game two of the world series but you can get more from taco bell and if you happened to be there, it is an
as washington state. >> memories of hurricane irene the left billions in damage to have people determined not to get caught off guard. virginia and maryland the party declared states of emergency. people are being told to prepare for the worst. >> governor o'malley has already signed an executive order declaring a state of emergency in maryland. it gives the state flexibility and calling up the maryland national guard. local jurisdictions have been in planning meetings all day. >> storm preparedness starts at home. this san derrin, for example, is for fell's point residents -- this sand dune, for example, is for fell's point residents. hurricane sandy, the super storm, it has lots of names, but one devastating consequence depending on which path it takes. >> we still do not know what the storm is going to do. we know that it is coming to baltimore county. >> the concern that we have about this particular event is the duration of it which would continue through thursday. >> the baltimore county emergency operations center opens sunday. emergency equipment have been inspected. officials wil
nervous. >> you think it's going to be bad? >> i think so. >> i'm worried. we lucked out with irene, and i don't know. this may be worse. >> nbc's tom strong traung is l rehoboth beach, delaware. any residents left? >> they have about eight hours, the governor issues a mandatory evacuation area. everybody must be out by 8:00. look down the beach, have you several dozen people trying to get their last glimpse. right now, low tide. looks pretty impressive. come high tide, around 6:30, it wouldn't be a surprise if we didn't see water coming up to this fence here. all around rehoboth beach, a lot of businesses boarded up. people making runs to the grocery store, water short, bread is short. people did what they could in terms of preparation. they had about eight hours, around that time, this area will be shut down. cut off the bridges and roads into here it won't be a very pleasant place to stay if the electricity is going to go out. which is a likelihood. 2,000 utility workers and we're talking about the maryland/dc area, baltimore areas, and states of emergencies in those areas as well. a lo
back there is a storm fence put up. as i understand it, when hurricane irene hit, it came about that far, maybe a little further out. and with a lot of people at first were hesitant to evacuate because they said irene wasn't that bad. most of the damage of flooding was inland and not here on the coast. as you can see, the coast is just washed away. it's completely gone. as i said, it extends perhaps about 100 yards outs in na direction. the same situation from the north and cape may in the south, down near at alantic city towards the tip of new jersey and the garden state parkway the main highway into that area, which bisects of entire state, has been closed off because they don't want people to go back into that area. it's completely vevacuated, and right now somewhere from here to there is where the storm is expected to hit. we're going to take cover when we have to. we're in a position that's somewhat prekd prekted. it's enough protected we feel safe enough. again, things are deteriorating very quickly by the hour. >> all right. >> reporter: back to you guys. >> thank you, ro
surge right now, that's just the water rise alone with this, 6.6 feet. that's 2.2 feet higher than irene. we're awaiting that high tide coming up. for example, irene was about right here, all right, and what we could see with another two and a half feet is up through here. >> no campaigning for the president. he is locked down at the white house, telephoning governors and mayors and meeting with fema. >> mitt romney is not campaigning but holding what his campaign calls a hurricane relief event coincidentally in battleground ohio. >> we have a lot of goods here and i know there's more coming in and we're going to box these things up in just a minute and put them on some trucks and then we're going to send them into i think it's new jersey. >> new yorkers ordered off the streets last night it was a lonely late night for letterman and fallon. no live audiences to laugh at their jokes. >> got up this morning, turned on the radio and listened for the talk show closings. i have no luck. >> talk show closings. >> yeah. >> that's a play on -- >> wait a minute. i think i hear people banging at t
in new york city, lower manhattan in the battery, right where i was for irene, major power problems, flooding and surge, damage and power losses narragansett, buzzard's bay, but regardless, both scenarios here mean major disruptions for transportation, and commerce, major losses of power, power damage, and brian, really both of the scenarios paint a multi-million or even billion disaster, we have to keep a close eye on this as it will affect, as you mentioned, millions of people. >> jim, there don't seem to be good options here, we'll watch the weather as we just begin the coverage of the storm as it makes its way up the east coast. >>> now as we mentioned, the furious campaigning for the office, just 12 days to go, new polling, the marist poll in colorado, showing a dead heat with romney and obama at 48, and nevada, obama has a slight lead, over romney, 50-47 right now then the state of ohio, peter alexander traveling with the romney campaign in defiance, ohio, good evening peter. >> reporter: brian, good evening to you, these days the "o" in ohio could be optimism, this is the mos
. thank you for being with us. >> thank you. >> we're going to be taking your calls on hurricane irene -- did i say irene? >> you are so retro. >> god i'm doing like a hundred things here. >> can you absolutely positively guarantee that it will give me an orgasm? >> yeah. >> announcer: it's the "stephanie miller show." ♪ ♪ the trucks are going farther. the new 2013 ram 1500. ♪ ♪ with the best-in-class fuel economy. engineered to move heaven and earth. ♪ ♪ guts. glory. ram. the natural energy of peanuts and delicious, soft caramel. to fill you up and keep you moving, whatever your moves. payday. fill up and go! ♪ ♪ one night in bangkok [ inaudible ] can't be to careful with your company ♪ ♪ i can't feel the devil walking next to -- >> announcer: stephanie miller. ♪ i get my kicks above the waistline, sunshine ♪ >> obama: i'm not worried about the impact on the election. i'm worried about the impact on our families on our first responders, on our economy and transportation. >> that was the president being presidential yesterday. >> i'm worr
is that we kind of had those same warnings for irene. i don't want people to go oh, they just say that all the time just to get our attention. but, no, there is potential for some dire stuff going on here. and we're talking about power down -- power lines down trees down, all kinds of other things. finally the computers are agreeing. and you can see a couple doing loops. if this thing does a loop right over new york or new jersey or pennsylvania, that means 24 to 36 hours of rain coming down an inch in an hour. do the math. that's a couple feet of potential water. here we go. the potential impacts, i think the coastal infland flooding the biggest. obviously we saw that in vermont from irene. the waves will be larger than 30 feet battering long island, new rhode island all the way to massachusetts and new jersey depending on where it lands. coastal erosion. we could lose homes as the beach gets washed away and power outages could be in the millions taking literally maybe a week to get all those power lines back up. and that could be far enough that it could affect the ele
for this outdoor reporting. >> been bringing us great updates. >> she dade great job too last year with irene. i think she was in north carolina. >> anyway, we'll check back in with kayla later this morning. let's also take a look at the markets. the futures are indicated higher after all the concerns that have been out there. the s&p futures up by more than 9.5 points. the dow futures are up by 65 points. not a lot of news stories that have been coming through. you've heard some earnings here and there. yesterday we had ford out early with better than expected numbers early. and there are a few other stories that have been out there, too. you guys see the ubs story? >> 10,000 jobs. >> 10,000 jobs this they were laying off. a lot of people found out when they showed up for work in london and their cards didn't work. other people found out because their e-mail kept bouncing back. that's the worst situation i've ever heard. it's not going to get nearly enough attention because of all the other things that are happening out there. >> did you see the other big merger yesterday? disney and "star wars
. but people are taking preparations. and perhaps because of this, victor. when irene came through, irene was more of a direct hit in this area. in fact, there's a coastal road that runs along here, highway 12, a good part of that was washed out. they're not expecting quite a direct hit with this particular storm, but again, they are talking about the wind, the rain and power outages. and victor, that's really what people are bracing for as the storm gets to us. >> i'm wondering, george, i saw an analyst yesterday saying this is going to be a lot worse than irene. are people sticking around for it, or are they boarding up and getting out of town? >> reporter: you know, when you walk around, when you take a look at how people are preparing for this storm, everyone's keeping a very close eye on us, as we report what's happening. they're watching the track of the storm system. right now it looks like it will move in a little further north than where we are. but we will feel the first brunt of the storm. we will see a lot of the winds that come through, the winds that could get up 40, 50 mile
because our viewers may remember this incident. it's from hurricane irene. the coast guard and fire and rescue teams had to swim out into the rough, into the rough water to rescue a couple who had lived on their boat. how is the koebs guacoast guardg for search and rescue missions during sandy? continue. >> you know, certainly your coast guard is ready all the time to do those cases. first thing, of course, is preparation. we tell the public, it's time to stay away. we try to minimize folks that are storm chasers or sightseers in heavy weather. standing on the rocks, going out on the rip rap of a break water is not a safe place to be. it's time to be prudent when you're around the water. the winds and the seas are unpredictable and you need to stay ashore. >> at this point, i asked general russel honore the same thing, i only have about 20 seconds if you can answer, are we making the right decisions here and do you think people are heeding the warnings? >> yes, i think so. we've been working this since the middle of last week. with flights offshore, warning ships offshore. they've d
irene hit this area a lot of people evacuated. the coast wasn't hit that hard. the bigger problem was inland. that's why [ inaudible ] behind this time but for the most -- staying behind last time but for now people are pushing out because of the danger, the high winds are obvious. we're in a very protected position, by the way, and we're going to move back if things get worse. but again, we're charting it by the hour every hour and for now, things here are under control, but again it's getting to be a very dangerous situation down here. andrea? >> i was going to ask you that exact question, ron. so you and your crew, you know what to do. but the people who are -- and this is repeating the president's appeal, what chris christie has said, mike bloomberg, the appeal to people who are refusing to evacuate because they are putting first responders in danger and as i'm looking at the pictures of you, ron, the shape of that beach along the jersey shore is never going to be the same. this is going to have to be restored in some way because the enormous erosion already is being washed aw
as it comes in, this is a cold wind. this is nothing like irene. irene was tropical, warm, no problem at all. this is actually cold, so not very comfort l, but you wouldn't want to -- comforting, but you wouldn't want to miss this, would you? >> bruce, get back with us. we want you on this side of the ocean, not in the ocean. >>> andrea mccarren has been out all day on river road in bethesda. earlier she had the adventure of the blowing barriers. we'll find out where she is now. venezuelan? >> reporter: derek, we've had reinforcements here now. there's u.s. park police. the barriers have blown over to this side. there's some on the other side of the street. basically park police did the right thing. i think they've probably given up on them and they are planting a police cruiser in the middle of the intersection to prevent people from going down little falls parkway between river road and mass avenue. it is a very different bethesda that we're seeing right now. some of the wind guss have been extraordinary. look up river road now and you -- gust have been extraordinary. look up river road n
in years. that sounds very dramatic, but it isn't so when you think about what irene did to connecticut last year. irene, many people in new york and new jersey rolled their eyes at it and said it wasn't a very big deal. here in connecticut it was a very big deal. here in fairfield there were houses with not just broken windows, houses knocked off foundation and thrown into the water. they expect this to be even worse, the storm surge to be even worse here than it was during irene. so that's the major concern. there's the mandatory evacuations up and down the connecticut coast. the good news is that most people are heeding those evacuation orders. the other big concern is power outages. all the wind they are expecting to get up here, because the wind is going to be very strong up on the northern edge of this storm. the wind will cause a lot of power outages along with that flooding. they expect -- connecticut light and power expect as many as 600,000 people to be without power here in connecticut for days on end. during irene they were without power for days on end as well so everybody
during hurricane irene and it could take airlines days before they return to their normal operations. here at sfo i want to show you the departure board. you can see all of these cancellations but look at this right here t says that one of the flights going to new york is on time. now, as the storm changes throughout the day, flights could change, as well. so the best thing that travelers can do, check your flight status early. keep in mind that it could change and if you do need to make any changes try to do it at home over the phone or on your computer so that you can avoid the lines at the airport. at sfo, elissa harrington, cbs 5. >> thank you. >>> a fire in a new york city neighborhood flooded by super storm sandy destroyed at least 50 homes. more than 190 firefighters still battling the blaze this morning. it's in queens. firefighters say about 25 people are trapped in the upstairs unit of the apartment building and that some rescues are now being carried out by boat because of chest-high water on the street. >>> president barack obama has declared a major disaster in new york
get. you are would have to make your own way. >> where do you rate this? >> i was here for irene. certainly, as everyone else has said, it is a more intense and unprecedented storm to what it has done to operations, we are also bringing some of them back. >> thank you for joining us tonight. >> we have re-established on the phone, m.laroso on the phone. thank you for joining us. how long, we are asking the questions everyone else wants answers to i'm sure. >> glad to give you information. we've been able to make good progress today. we are down from our peak from under 1.4 million customers. so, more than 25% of the location that is were damaged those customers that weere interrupted were restored. we were able to restore service to newark airport. we restored service to the city of newark and elizabeth. >> the remains million people how long will they have to wait? >> i don't want to give you an exact number. we think there will be stragglers. those are the customers that have individual services down. but we plan to get most of the customers back within that seven day window. >
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